Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com

Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com

Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com – ArticlesCeliac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com – ArticlesVitamin K2 for Healthy Bones and ArteriesAs Other Grains Gain Ground, Wheat Has Never Been Less PopularNew Model Predicts Survival in Refractory Celiac Patients

http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fftr.fivefilters.org%2Fmakefulltextfeed.php%3Furl%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.celiac.com%252Farticlerss.php%26max%3D5&max=5 Celiac disease and gluten-free diet information at Celiac.com. Celiac disease, also known as gluten intolerance, is a genetic disorder that affects at least 1 in 133 Americans. Symptoms of celiac disease can range from the classic features, such as diarrhea, weight loss, and malnutrition, to latent symptoms such as isolated nutrient deficiencies but no gastrointestinal symptoms. 20 http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fftr.fivefilters.org%2Fmakefulltextfeed.php%3Furl%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.celiac.com%252Farticlerss.php%26max%3D5&max=5 http://www.celiac.com/apple-icon-180×180.png http://www.celiac.com/articles/24553/1/Vitamin-K2-for-Healthy-Bones-and-Arteries/Page1.html http://www.celiac.com/articles/24553/1/Vitamin-K2-for-Healthy-Bones-and-Arteries/Page1.html <div readability=”33.912121212121″><span><a valign=”absmiddle” href=”http://www.celiac.com/articlerss/author/1504″ target=”_blank”><img src=”http://www.celiac.com/templates/Gryphon/Images/icon_Rss.gif” border=”0″/></a> <span><a align=”left” valign=”absmiddle” href=”http://www.celiac.com/articlerss/author/1504?podcastonly=1″ target=”_blank”><img src=”http://www.celiac.com/templates/Gryphon/Images/podcast.gif” border=”0″/></a></span></span> <h3>Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD</h3> <img src=”http://www.celiac.com/authorpics/59c4c27e0310e230458c5604245933d6.jpg” class=”Picture” border=”0″ align=”left”/><p>Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD is Assistant Professor, NY Chiropractic College, MS Clinical Nutrition Program Nutrition Assessment Course &amp; Food Science Course.  She is author of the following books:<br/></p> <ul><li>Fast and Simple Diabetes Menus, McGraw Hill Companies</li> <li>Diabetes Meals on the Run, Contemporary Books</li> <li>Living With Food Allergies, Contemporary Books</li> <li>Diabetic Desserts, Contemporary Books</li> <li>Quick &amp; Easy Diabetes Menus Cookbook, Contemporary Books</li> <li>American Diabetes Association Holiday Cookbook and Parties &amp; Special Celebrations Cookbook, Prentice Hall Books</li> </ul><br/><a href=”http://www.celiac.com/authors/1504/Betty–Wedman-St–Louis…..–PhD…..–RD”>View all articles by Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD</a></div><div itemprop=”articlebody” readability=”94.242885074951″> <div itemprop=”image”><span class=”FeatureImageSpanArticle”><img src=”http://www.celiac.com/content_images/french_cheese_CC–Jessica_Spengler_thumb.jpg” property=”og:image” class=”Picture” width=”600″ height=”450″/></span><br/><span class=”FeatureImageSpanArticle”>Image: CC–Jessica Spengler</span></div> <p>Celiac.com 10/18/2016 – Vitamin K was discovered in 1929 and named for the German word koagulation with Herrick Dam and Edward A. Doisy receiving the Nobel Prize for their research in 1943. But Vitamin K is a multi-functional nutrient.</p> <p>Vitamin K1 or phyloquinone is found in green leafy vegetables like spinach and used by the liver for blood coagulation within 10 hours.</p> <p>Vitamin K2 or menaquinone (referred to as MK-4 through MK-10) comes from natto (fermented soybeans), organ meats, egg yolks, and raw milk cheeses. It circulates throughout the body over a 24 hour period and is synthesized in the human gut by microbiota according to the Annual Review of Nutrition 2009. Aging and antibiotic use weakens the body’s ability to produce K2 so supplementation needs to be considered.</p> <p>The Rotterdam Study in the Journal of Nutrition 2004 brought into focus the role of K2 as an inhibitor of calcification in the arteries and the major contributor to bone rebuilding osteocalcin- NOT calcium supplementation that many health professionals had recommend. The study reports K2 resulted in 50 percent reduction in arterial calcification, 50 percent reduction in cardiovascular deaths, and 25 percent reduction in all cause <a class=”HelpLink” href=”javascript:void(0)” onclick=”showHelpTip(event, ‘&lt;b&gt;mortality&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br&gt;&lt;br&gt;The ratio of deaths in an area to the population of that area expressed per 1000 per year.’); return false”>mortality</a>. K1 had no effect on cardiovascular health.</p> <p>Dennis Goodman, M.D. in Vitamin K2- The Missing Nutrient for Heart and Bone Disease describes why most western diets are deficient in K2. Dietary awareness of Vitamin K has focused on anti-clotting since warfarin was approved as a medicine (in 1948 it was launched by the Germans as rat poisoning) and President Eisenhower was administered warfarin following his heart attack. Little attention was paid to any other nutritional importance this essential fat-soluble vitamin could provide.</p> <p>Menaquinones (K2 or MK) are rapidly depleted without dietary intake of natto or animal sources needed for repletion which results in bone health issues, especially in menopause. Without it, the body does not use calcium and Vitamin D3 to activate osteoblasts to rebuild bone. Menaquinones cause cells to produce a protein called osteocalcin which incorporates the calcium into the bone. Without it, calcium moves into the artery wall and soft tissues of the body leading to hardening of the arteries and <a class=”HelpLink” href=”javascript:void(0)” onclick=”showHelpTip(event, ‘&lt;b&gt;osteoporosis&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br&gt;&lt;br&gt;Abnormal loss of bony tissue resulting in fragile porous bones attributable to a lack of calcium or lack of proper calcium absorption.’); return false”>osteoporosis</a>.</p> <p>The benefit of K2 is not new research. In 1997 Shearer presented the roles of vitamins D and K in bone health and osteoporosis prevention in the Proceedings of Nutrition Society. The <a class=”HelpLink” href=”javascript:void(0)” onclick=”showHelpTip(event, ‘&lt;b&gt;Osteoporosis&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br&gt;&lt;br&gt;Abnormal loss of bony tissue resulting in fragile porous bones attributable to a lack of calcium or lack of proper calcium absorption.’); return false”>Osteoporosis</a> International meeting in New Zealand 2013 re-emphasized this nutrient’s importance proclaiming the best treatment for osteoporosis is achieving a strong peak bone mass before 30 years old and increasing Vitamin K2 food sources in the diet throughout life.</p> <p>The richest food source of K2 is the Japanese fermented soybean natto, which is produced with Bacillus natto, a <a class=”HelpLink” href=”javascript:void(0)” onclick=”showHelpTip(event, ‘&lt;b&gt;bacterium&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br&gt;&lt;br&gt;A single-celled microorganism. ‘); return false”>bacterium</a> that converts K1 to MK-7. Fermented cheeses like Swiss and Jarlsberg contain Mk-8 and Mk-9 which can be converted to K2 at a 20 to 40 percent lower rate than from natto, but more appealing to the western taste buds. Grass-fed beef and egg yolks are the most common source of K2 in the American diet.</p> <p>For those who have not acquired a taste for fermented soybeans or natto, my nutrition mentor, Adelle Davis, had it right when she recommended eating liver once a week. Celiacs need to be sure that their diets include ample red meats, eggs and fermented cheeses or yogurt or else dietary supplementation with Vitamin K2 (MK-4) is recommended. Without it, bones can become soft tissues and arteries “turn to stone” or calcified.</p> <p>A Chart of Vitamin K levels in Foods can provide insight into food choices for menaquinone compared to Vitamin K1. It was adapted from Schurgers et al. Nutritional intake of vitamins K1 (phylloquinone) and K2 (menaquinone) in the Netherlands. J Nutr. Environ. Med. 1999.</p> <table border=”1″ cellspacing=”10″ cellpadding=”10″ align=”center”><tbody><tr><td>Food</td> <td>K1</td> <td>MK-4</td> <td>MK-7,8,9</td> </tr><tr><td>Meats</td> <td>0.5-5</td> <td>1-30</td> <td>0.1-2</td> </tr><tr><td>Fish</td> <td>0.1-1</td> <td>0.1-2</td> <td> </td> </tr><tr><td>Green Vegetables</td> <td>100-750</td> <td> </td> <td> </td> </tr><tr><td>Natto</td> <td>20-40</td> <td> </td> <td>900-1200</td> </tr><tr><td>Cheese</td> <td>0.5-10</td> <td>0.5-10</td> <td>40-80</td> </tr><tr><td>Eggs (yolk)</td> <td>0.5-2.5</td> <td>10-25</td> <td> </td> </tr></tbody></table> <p>The American Heart Association and many medical professionals who advocated no organ meats or red meat and egg yolks, deprived Americans of primary sources of Vitamin K2 which is essential for bone and cardiovascular health.</p> <p>Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).</p> <br/><div class=”ArticleExtra”> <h2><strong>Related Articles</strong></h2> </div> <br/></div><p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”>Let’s block ads!</a></strong> <a href=”https://github.com/fivefilters/block-ads/wiki/There-are-no-acceptable-ads”>(Why?)</a></p> Tue, 18 Oct 2016 17:30:00 +0000 no@spam.com (Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD) Vitamin K2 for Healthy Bones and Arteries – Celiac.com Article Vitamin K was discovered in 1929 and named for the German word koagulation with Herrick Dam and Edward A. Doisy receiving the Nobel Prize for their research in 1943. But Vitamin K is a multi-functional nutrient. http://www.celiac.com/articles/24553/1/Vitamin-K2-for-Healthy-Bones-and-Arteries/Page1.html http://www.celiac.com/content_images/french_cheese_CC–Jessica_Spengler_thumb.jpg sv text/html http://www.celiac.com/articles/24553/1/Vitamin-K2-for-Healthy-Bones-and-Arteries/Page1.html http://www.celiac.com/articles/24543/1/As-Other-Grains-Gain-Ground-Wheat-Has-Never-Been-Less-Popular/Page1.html http://www.celiac.com/articles/24543/1/As-Other-Grains-Gain-Ground-Wheat-Has-Never-Been-Less-Popular/Page1.html <div readability=”39.330490405117″><span><a valign=”absmiddle” href=”http://www.celiac.com/articlerss/author/2″ target=”_blank”><img src=”http://www.celiac.com/templates/Gryphon/Images/icon_Rss.gif” border=”0″/></a> <span><a align=”left” valign=”absmiddle” href=”http://www.celiac.com/articlerss/author/2?podcastonly=1″ target=”_blank”><img src=”http://www.celiac.com/templates/Gryphon/Images/podcast.gif” border=”0″/></a></span></span> <h3>Jefferson Adams</h3> <img src=”http://www.celiac.com/authorpics/80c8b36ed4cc41e340843dab42f796f9.jpg” class=”Picture” border=”0″ align=”left”/><p>Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. His poems, essays and photographs have appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate among others.</p> <p>He is a member of both the National Writers Union, the International Federation of Journalists, and covers San Francisco Health News for <a href=”http://www.examiner.com/health-news-in-san-francisco/jefferson-adams” target=”_blank”>Examiner.com</a>.</p> <a href=”http://www.celiac.com/authors/2/Jefferson–Adams”>View all articles by Jefferson Adams</a></div><div itemprop=”articlebody” readability=”81.610200364299″> <div itemprop=”image”><span class=”FeatureImageSpanArticle”><img src=”http://www.celiac.com/content_images/wheat–cc–neil_williamson_thumb.jpg” property=”og:image” class=”Picture” width=”547″ height=”825″/></span><br/><span class=”FeatureImageSpanArticle”>Popularity of whole grains soars, but wheat struggles to compete. Photo: CC–Neil Williamson</span></div> <p>Celiac.com 10/18/2016 – Whole grains, including gluten-free grains, have never been more popular, but as their fortunes grow as a whole, that of wheat is diminishing.</p> <p>The whole grains category includes both gluten-free grains, such as quinoa and other ancient grains, and gluten grains, such as barley, rye and triticale, but wheat products have never been less popular, and continue their downward sales slide.</p> <p>This year, 1,282 new products have registered for the Whole Grain Stamp so far, a pace set to meet or beat last year’s record of 2,122 new products; up from 1,666 in 2014 and 1,622 in 2013, according to Cynthia Harriman, director of food and nutrition strategies at the Whole Grains Council. More than half of new products with the Whole Grain Stamp had a gluten-free first ingredient last year, an increase over 33% in 2007 to 2009, according to Harriman. However, even as scientists question the claimed benefits of gluten-free foods, such as weight loss, for people without celiac disease, many consumers are eating gluten-free foods “just for the variety,” Harriman said.</p> <p>Either way, the market for gluten-free foods is set to approach $5 billion by 2021, up from $2.84 billion in 2014. Going forward, more of that market will go to gluten-free grains, lees to wheat.</p> <p>Flour used to be the main way consumers bought whole grains, but now consumers and manufacturers are embracing complete, minimally processed whole grains, which can improve product textures, flavors and health benefits.</p> <p>Sprouted grains are also receiving more attention and are expected to generate product sales of $250 million by 2018. Overall, 27% of consumers say they are eating more whole grains than they did six months ago, according to a recent survey.</p> <p>Read more at <a href=”http://www.fooddive.com/news/popularity-of-whole-grains-soars-but-whole-wheat-slides/424365/” target=”_blank”>Fooddive.com</a>.</p> <p>Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).</p> <br/><div class=”ArticleExtra”> <h2><strong>Related Articles</strong></h2> </div> <br/></div><p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”>Let’s block ads!</a></strong> <a href=”https://github.com/fivefilters/block-ads/wiki/There-are-no-acceptable-ads”>(Why?)</a></p> Tue, 18 Oct 2016 15:30:00 +0000 no@spam.com (Jefferson Adams) As Other Grains Gain Ground, Wheat Has Never Been Less Popular – Celiac.com Article Whole grains, including gluten-free grains, have never been more popular, but as their fortunes grow as a whole, that of wheat is diminishing. http://www.celiac.com/articles/24543/1/As-Other-Grains-Gain-Ground-Wheat-Has-Never-Been-Less-Popular/Page1.html http://www.celiac.com/content_images/wheat–cc–neil_williamson_thumb.jpg cy text/html http://www.celiac.com/articles/24543/1/As-Other-Grains-Gain-Ground-Wheat-Has-Never-Been-Less-Popular/Page1.html http://www.celiac.com/articles/24545/1/New-Model-Predicts-Survival-in-Refractory-Celiac-Patients/Page1.html http://www.celiac.com/articles/24545/1/New-Model-Predicts-Survival-in-Refractory-Celiac-Patients/Page1.html <div readability=”39.330490405117″><span><a valign=”absmiddle” href=”http://www.celiac.com/articlerss/author/2″ target=”_blank”><img src=”http://www.celiac.com/templates/Gryphon/Images/icon_Rss.gif” border=”0″/></a> <span><a align=”left” valign=”absmiddle” href=”http://www.celiac.com/articlerss/author/2?podcastonly=1″ target=”_blank”><img src=”http://www.celiac.com/templates/Gryphon/Images/podcast.gif” border=”0″/></a></span></span> <h3>Jefferson Adams</h3> <img src=”http://www.celiac.com/authorpics/80c8b36ed4cc41e340843dab42f796f9.jpg” class=”Picture” border=”0″ align=”left”/><p>Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. His poems, essays and photographs have appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate among others.</p> <p>He is a member of both the National Writers Union, the International Federation of Journalists, and covers San Francisco Health News for <a href=”http://www.examiner.com/health-news-in-san-francisco/jefferson-adams” target=”_blank”>Examiner.com</a>.</p> <a href=”http://www.celiac.com/authors/2/Jefferson–Adams”>View all articles by Jefferson Adams</a></div><div itemprop=”articlebody” readability=”88.45703125″> <div itemprop=”image”><span class=”FeatureImageSpanArticle”><img src=”http://www.celiac.com/content_images/compass–cc–jurgen_appelo_thumb.jpg” property=”og:image” class=”Picture” width=”600″ height=”598″/></span><br/><span class=”FeatureImageSpanArticle”>Can a new predictive survival model help Refractory Celiac patients? Photo: CC–Jurgen Appelo</span></div> <p>Celiac.com 10/17/2016 – <a class=”HelpLink” href=”javascript:void(0)” onclick=”showHelpTip(event, ‘&lt;b&gt;Refractory&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br&gt;&lt;br&gt;Resistant to treatment or cure.’); return false”>Refractory</a> celiac disease is a severe condition with few good treatment options, and which often eventually results in death. A group of researchers recently set out to create a prognostic model to estimate survival of patients with <a class=”HelpLink” href=”javascript:void(0)” onclick=”showHelpTip(event, ‘&lt;b&gt;refractory&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br&gt;&lt;br&gt;Resistant to treatment or cure.’); return false”>refractory</a> celiac disease.</p> <p>The research team included A. Rubio-Tapia, G. Malamut, W. H. M. Verbeek, R. L. J. van Wanrooij, D. A. Leffler, S. I. Niveloni, C. Arguelles-Grande, B. D. Lahr, A. R. Zinsmeister, J. A. Murray, C. P. Kelly, J. C. Bai, P. H. Green, S. Daum, C. J. J. Mulder, and C. Cellier. They are variously affiliated with the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA, the Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Paris, France, the Hospital Dr. Carlos Nonorino Udaondo, Buenos Aires, Argentina, the Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA, the Charite-University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany, and the VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.</p> <p>Before setting up their prognostic model, the team first assessed predictors of 5-year <a class=”HelpLink” href=”javascript:void(0)” onclick=”showHelpTip(event, ‘&lt;b&gt;mortality&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br&gt;&lt;br&gt;The ratio of deaths in an area to the population of that area expressed per 1000 per year.’); return false”>mortality</a> using Cox proportional hazards regression on subjects from a multinational registry. The team used bootstrap resampling to internally validate the individual factors and overall model performance. To calculate a risk score for 5-year mortality, the team averaged all estimated regression coefficients gathered from 400 bootstrap models that they formulated from their multinational <a class=”HelpLink” href=”javascript:void(0)” onclick=”showHelpTip(event, ‘&lt;b&gt;cohort&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br&gt;&lt;br&gt;A group of individuals who share a particular statistical or demographic characteristic, for example, the cohort of all children born in 1995.’); return false”>cohort</a> of 232 patients diagnosed with refractory celiac disease across seven centers.</p> <p>Average patient age was 53 years and the group included 150 women out of the 232 patient total. A total of 51 subjects died during a 5-year follow-up, which put the cumulative 5-year all-cause mortality at 30%.</p> <p>The results from a multiple variable Cox proportional hazards model showed that the following variables were significantly associated with 5-year mortality: age at refractory celiac disease diagnosis (per 20 year increase, hazard ratio = 2.21; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.38–3.55), abnormal <a class=”HelpLink” href=”javascript:void(0)” onclick=”showHelpTip(event, ‘&lt;b&gt;intraepithelial&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br&gt;&lt;br&gt;Within the layer of cells that form the surface or lining of an organ.’); return false”>intraepithelial</a> <a class=”HelpLink” href=”javascript:void(0)” onclick=”showHelpTip(event, ‘&lt;b&gt;lymphocytes&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br&gt;&lt;br&gt;Major component of the cellular immune system (in contrast to the humoral immune system) that consists of T-Cells and B-Cells and is largely responsible for attacking intracellular organisms.’); return false”>lymphocytes</a> (hazard ratio = 2.85; 95% CI: 1.22–6.62), and albumin (per 0.5 unit increase, hazard ratio = 0.72; 95% CI: 0.61–0.85). A simple weighted three-factor risk score was created to estimate 5-year survival.</p> <p>The team’s prognostic model for predicting 5-year mortality among patients with refractory celiac disease may help clinicians to guide treatment and follow-up.</p> <p>Source:</p> <p>Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).</p> <br/><div class=”ArticleExtra”> <h2><strong>Related Articles</strong></h2> </div> <br/></div><p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”>Let’s block ads!</a></strong> <a href=”https://github.com/fivefilters/block-ads/wiki/There-are-no-acceptable-ads”>(Why?)</a></p> Mon, 17 Oct 2016 15:30:00 +0000 no@spam.com (Jefferson Adams) New Model Predicts Survival in Refractory Celiac Patients – Celiac.com Article Refractory celiac disease is a severe condition with few good treatment options, and which often eventually results in death. A group of researchers recently set out to create a prognostic model to estimate survival of patients with refractory celiac disease. http://www.celiac.com/articles/24545/1/New-Model-Predicts-Survival-in-Refractory-Celiac-Patients/Page1.html http://www.celiac.com/content_images/compass–cc–jurgen_appelo_thumb.jpg cy text/html http://www.celiac.com/articles/24545/1/New-Model-Predicts-Survival-in-Refractory-Celiac-Patients/Page1.html

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