News-Medical.Net /Celiac Disease News Feed

News-Medical.Net /Celiac Disease News Feed

News-Medical.Net /Celiac Disease News FeedFactors that impact fertility in menStudy finds 1 in 5 pediatric celiac disease patients on gluten-free diet sustain persistent intestinal damageEarly life history and genetics may play crucial role in shaping gut microbiome

http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.news-medical.net%2Fsyndication.axd%3Ftag%3D%2FCeliac-Disease&max=5 Latest /Celiac Disease News and Research http://www.news-medical.net/news/20161208/Factors-that-impact-fertility-in-men.aspx http://www.news-medical.net/post.aspx?id=4005c738-c6e5-4a52-81ab-e1225ed7f7b0 <p>Starting a family can be a stressful process, and there are things that can affect your plans that you may not have considered. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 18 percent of men who sought help with a fertility specialist were diagnosed with a male-related infertility. Here are some factors from the Texas A&amp;M College of Nursing that can impact your fertility.</p> <p>Ban briefs; go boxers<br />Elevated temperatures can impair sperm production and function. Although studies are limited and inconclusive, if you’re trying to start a family, switch from briefs to boxers. The change won’t happen right away; it will take your body about six to eight weeks to adjust to your new wardrobe.</p> <p>Skip happy hour<br />Drinking alcohol can lower testosterone levels, cause erectile dysfunction and decrease sperm production. Prolonged drinking can also lead to liver disease, which can impact fertility.</p> <div class=”related-content-embed”> <h3>Related Stories</h3> </div> <p>A study published in 2014 suggested that drinking just five units of alcohol every week could reduce the quality of a man’s sperm, and that more alcohol correlated with weaker quality of sperm. It’s also good practice for your partner’s pregnancy, as men’s alcohol consumption can make it more difficult for a woman to stop drinking, which is vital for the health of the baby.</p> <p>Kick the butt<br />Men who smoke may have a lower sperm count than those who don’t. Even secondhand smoke has been shown to reduce fertility in both assisted and non-assisted pregnancies. In 2016, a study showed that smoking was associated with decreased sperm count, decreased sperm motility and poor sperm morphology.</p> <p>If you’ve had trouble quitting in the past, talk to your health care provider for tips, as some quitting methods may provide small doses of nicotine that can affect fertility.</p> <p>Watch your weight<br />Being overweight or underweight can have negatively impact a man’s sperm count and can decrease his libido. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 70 percent of adults were overweight or obese in 2014, and an estimated 1.7 percent of adults were underweight as of 2010.</p> <p>The first step to improving your weight is managing your diet, so be sure to talk to your health care provider about ways to improve your nutrition intake.</p> <p>Go get checked<br />There are many different underlying conditions that can affect male fertility, such as tumors, celiac disease and varicocele—a condition in which the veins are large and cause the testicles to overheat. If you’ve been diagnosed with any of these conditions, or are worried about any conditions you may have, talk to your primary care provider about what options are available for you.</p> <div class=”content-source”> <div class=”content-src-value”> <p>Texas A&amp;M University</p> </div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://github.com/fivefilters/block-ads/wiki/There-are-no-acceptable-ads”>(Why?)</a></p> Fri, 09 Dec 2016 00:42:16 +0000 Factors that impact fertility in men article http://www.news-medical.net/image.axd?picture=2014%2f7%2fFertility-620×480.jpg http://www.news-medical.net/news/20161208/Factors-that-impact-fertility-in-men.aspx Starting a family can be a stressful process, and there are things that can affect your plans that you may not have considered. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 18 percent of men who sought help with a fertility specialist were diagnosed with a male-related infertility. it text/html http://www.news-medical.net/news/20161208/Factors-that-impact-fertility-in-men.aspx http://www.news-medical.net/news/20161130/Study-finds-1-in-5-pediatric-celiac-disease-patients-on-gluten-free-diet-sustain-persistent-intestinal-damage.aspx http://www.news-medical.net/post.aspx?id=f94c819a-732a-4b18-9e9a-ceb9a1bda812 <p>In surprising findings, researchers from MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) and Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) have discovered that nearly one in five children with celiac disease sustained persistent intestinal damage, despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. The findings are consistent with recent research in adults, which showed that more than 33 percent of adult patients on a gluten-free diet have persistent intestinal damage, despite a reduction of symptoms or the results of blood tests.</p> <p>”This study confirms that we need to look more aggressively for mucosal healing in all patients, not just adults,” says Maureen Leonard, MD, MMSc, clinical director of the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at MGHfC and co-lead author of the report published online in the <em>Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition</em>. Findings from the study have already been translated into revised clinical care practices at MGHfC, where most pediatric patients over the age of 10 will be monitored for mucosal healing with a repeat endoscopy, along with follow-up blood testing, after one year of treatment with the gluten-free diet.</p> <p>Current guidelines for pediatric celiac disease patients recommend a single biopsy at diagnosis and follow-up blood testing to monitor recovery of the intestinal mucosa. In a related commentary that has also been published online in JPGN, Ivor Hill, MD, of Nationwide Children’s Hospital and the Ohio State University School of Medicine echoed the call to revisit current treatment guidelines and also raised questions about the prevalence of intestinal damage in children with celiac disease and the best way to move forward, considering the results of the current study. “Until we have a reliable non-invasive means of determining mucosal healing in children with CD, it seems the biopsy will remain important both for initial diagnosis and subsequent monitoring,” Hill wrote.</p> <p>Although the long-term risks for children with persistent intestinal damage are not clear, such damage in adults has been linked to an increased risk of lymphoma, low bone density and fracture. The study authors also note, “malabsorption and inflammation in children may have negative repercussions on physical and cognitive development.”</p> <p>Alessio Fasano, MD, director of the MGHfC center and co-senior author of the study, was also surprised by the results, which were based on a retrospective examination of the biopsy and medical records of 103 children with celiac disease treated at MGHfC or BCH. The children had been on the gluten-free diet for at least one year and were determined by dietitians and other hospital health care practitioners to have complied well with the diet. But repeat biopsies found persistent intestinal damage in 19 percent of them. “The number of children who don’t heal on the gluten-free diet was much higher than what I expected,” Fasano says.</p> <div class=”related-content-embed”> <h3>Related Stories</h3> </div> <p>Another finding that surprised Fasano was that blood levels of the autoantibody IgA tTG – the primary lab test used to monitor celiac disease – did not accurately measure mucosal recovery. In fact, the authors note, neither blood test results nor patients’ symptoms accurately predicted repeat biopsy results, and the tTG antibodies that are most effective for diagnosis were not as useful for monitoring the rate of mucosal healing.</p> <p>Fasano explains, “In the 1970s, pediatricians would perform three endoscopies – one at diagnosis, one after a year on the gluten-free diet, and a third during the following six months, to check for healing after the patient had been re-exposed to gluten and monitored for symptoms. When we developed robust blood screening tools in the 1990s, the number of endoscopies required for standard care was reduced to one and, most recently, to none in a subgroup of patients. We assumed that healing would occur once a patient was put on the gluten-free diet. Now that we have learned that this is not the case for all celiac patients, we are changing our clinical practice by repeating the endoscopy after one year of the implementation of the gluten-free diet.”</p> <p>The study was carried out by members of the Celiac Research Program at Harvard Medical School (HMS), a collaboration between MGHfC, BCH and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. As a result of the current findings, the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at MGHfC – which treats both adults and children with celiac disease and other gluten-related disorders – plans to undertake a collaborative, prospective study on the rate of mucosal healing in children.</p> <div class=”content-source”> <div class=”content-src-value”> <p>Massachusetts General Hospital</p> </div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://github.com/fivefilters/block-ads/wiki/There-are-no-acceptable-ads”>(Why?)</a></p> Thu, 01 Dec 2016 00:27:42 +0000 Study finds 1 in 5 pediatric celiac disease patients on gluten-free diet sustain persistent intestinal damage article http://www.news-medical.net/image.axd?picture=2016%2f3%2fChildren_playing_sunset_-_Zurijeta_8c5bdac77e44431bb1bfec67b9c87208-620×480.jpg http://www.news-medical.net/news/20161130/Study-finds-1-in-5-pediatric-celiac-disease-patients-on-gluten-free-diet-sustain-persistent-intestinal-damage.aspx In surprising findings, researchers from MassGeneral Hospital for Children and Boston Children’s Hospital have discovered that nearly one in five children with celiac disease sustained persistent intestinal damage, despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. ro text/html http://www.news-medical.net/news/20161130/Study-finds-1-in-5-pediatric-celiac-disease-patients-on-gluten-free-diet-sustain-persistent-intestinal-damage.aspx http://www.news-medical.net/news/20161129/Early-life-history-and-genetics-may-play-crucial-role-in-shaping-gut-microbiome.aspx http://www.news-medical.net/post.aspx?id=55f79ad9-aa85-4e2f-aaf8-fdf0abd5be8e <p>Genetics and birthplace have a big effect on the make-up of the microbial community in the gut, according to research published Nov. 28. in the journal <em>Nature Microbiology.</em></p> <p>The findings by a team of scientists from the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) represent an attempt to untangle the forces that shape the gut microbiome, which plays an important role in keeping us healthy.</p> <p>In the study, scientists linked specific genes in an animal – in this case, a mouse – to the presence and abundance of specific microbes in its gut.</p> <p>”We are starting to tease out the importance of different variables, like diet, genetics and the environment, on microbes in the gut,” said PNNL’s Janet Jansson, a corresponding author of the study. “It turns out that early life history and genetics both play a role.”</p> <p>Scientists studied more than 50,000 genetic variations in mice and ultimately identified more than 100 snippets that affect the population of microbes in the gut. Some of those genes in mice are very similar to human genes that are involved in the development of diseases like arthritis, colon cancer, Crohn’s disease, celiac disease and diabetes.</p> <p>The abundance of one microbe in particular, a probiotic strain of Lactobacillales, was affected by several host genes and was linked to higher levels of important immune cells known as T-helper cells. These results support the key role of the microbiome in the body’s immune response, and suggest the possibility that controlling the microbes in the gut could influence the immune system and disease vulnerability.</p> <p>”We know the microbiome likely plays an important role in fighting infections,” said first author Antoine Snijders of the Berkeley Lab. “We found that the level of T-helper cells in the blood of mice is well explained by the level of Lactobacillales in the gut. It’s the same family of bacteria found in yogurt and very often used as a probiotic.”</p> <div class=”related-content-embed”> <h3>Related Stories</h3> </div> <p>To do the research, the team drew upon a genetically diverse set of “collaborative cross” mice that capture the genetic variation in human populations. Scientists studied 30 strains of the mice, which were housed in two facilities with different environments for the first four weeks of their lives. The scientists took fecal samples from the mice to characterize their gut microbiomes before transferring them to a third facility.</p> <p>The researchers found that the microbiome retained a clear microbial signature formed where the mice were first raised – effectively their “hometown.” Moreover, that microbial trait carried over to the next generation, surprising the scientists.</p> <p>”The early life environment is very important for the formation of an individual’s microbiome,” said Jian-Hua Mao, a corresponding author from Berkeley Lab. “The first dose of microbes one gets comes from the mom, and that remains a strong influence for a lifetime and even beyond.”</p> <p>In brief, the team found that:</p> <ul><li>Both genetics and early environment play a strong role in determining an organism’s microbiome</li> <li>The genes in mice that were correlated to microbes in the gut are very similar to genes that are involved in many diseases in people</li> </ul><p>The researchers also found indications that moderate shifts in diet play a role in determining exactly what functions the microbes carry out in the gut.</p> <p>”Our findings could have some exciting implications for people’s health,” said Jansson. “In the future, perhaps people could have designer diets, optimized according to their genes and their microbiome, to digest foods more effectively or to modulate their susceptibility to disease.”</p> <div class=”content-source”> <div class=”content-src-value”> <p>DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory</p> </div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://github.com/fivefilters/block-ads/wiki/There-are-no-acceptable-ads”>(Why?)</a></p> Tue, 29 Nov 2016 09:22:45 +0000 Early life history and genetics may play crucial role in shaping gut microbiome article http://www.news-medical.net/image.axd?picture=2014%2f7%2fMicrobiology-620×480.jpg http://www.news-medical.net/news/20161129/Early-life-history-and-genetics-may-play-crucial-role-in-shaping-gut-microbiome.aspx Genetics and birthplace have a big effect on the make-up of the microbial community in the gut, according to research published Nov. 28. in the journal Nature Microbiology. da text/html http://www.news-medical.net/news/20161129/Early-life-history-and-genetics-may-play-crucial-role-in-shaping-gut-microbiome.aspx

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