Caring for Someone with Celiac

Caring for Someone with Celiac

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Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum – All Activity

Hi, I’m a dietitian with an autoimmune condition and previous work experience with prenatal health. I’ve been researching why the advice I gave when I was working helped so many women at the time worked – but isn’t in the mainstream medical treatment yet. Increasing magnesium rich foods such as beans, nuts, and seeds helped women that had a history of preeclampsia or high blood pressure to have a normal pregnancy.

In a nut shell – oxidative stress causes the placenta to increase flow of calcium. Too much calcium can cause other cellular reactions and fluid changes. And oxidative stress can be caused by gluten exposure when there is an underlying celiac autoimmune condition or probably other autoimmune conditions.

Re oxidative stress, and calcium channels in the placenta: Reactive Oxygen Species Inhibit Polycystin-2 (TRPP2) Cation Channel Activity In Term Human Syncytiotrophoblast

Re Celiac Sprue and oxidative stress, “long chain omega 3 fatty acids, plant flavonoids and carotenoids” were suggested as antioxidants that may help reduce the “oxidative stress, gene expression & production of inflammatory mediators”: Celiac disease, inflammation and oxidative damage: a nutrigenetic approach. Carotenoids include beta-carotene from carrots. Orange, red and dark green fruits and vegetables are generally good sources of carotenoids and plant flavonoids are also found in a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables. Omega 3 fatty acids are found in fish oil supplements or salmon, tuna, sardines – limit as a mercury source however during pregnancy or child bearing years. Vegetarian sources of a precursor omega 3 fat include flax seed meal (ground is digestible, whole flax seeds aren’t really), walnuts, and hemp seed kernels.

Sesame seeds, or tahini, sesame paste, has been shown in sports research to help reduce oxidative stress. The trial subjects ate 2 tablespoons per day of the seeds. Effects of Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) Supplementation on Creatine Kinase, Lactate Dehydrogenase, Oxidative Stress Markers, and Aerobic Capacity in Semi-Professional Soccer Players.

Dark chocolate has also been shown to be beneficial antioxidant source.

Best wishes to any Celiac sufferers – I avoid gluten due to intolerance, initially for fibromyalgia like symptoms, and later autoimmune thyroid antibodies were found but not antibodies for Celiac Sprue.

A dietitian can help work out more balanced diets when major food items have to be excluded for health purposes. A professional organization offers a search feature for helping to find a Registered Dietitian eatright.org/find-an-expert

What do you say to someone who doesn’t “get” the fact that gluten makes people sick? It’s not that people are intentionally callous and uncaring. They simply don’t understand that going gluten-free isn’t a fad or a choice for most people. This means that all too often when it comes to eating, they are perfectly content to go their merry way and eat whatever they want and if you’re with them, well, you’ll figure out something to eat.
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Well done, Jmg.

My husband has just brought home a pizza made by a major Pizza manufacturer.

It really does seem that every day, in every way, being gluten free is getting easier and easier!

http://www.goodfellaspizzas.com/our-range/gluten-free-range/

Hey guys!

Over the past few months, I’ve identified myself as extremely gluten sensitive (NCGS). I’ve been getting used to this diagnosis, but lately, I’ve had a lot of pain when eating random foods as well.

My doctor diagnosed me with IBS, which I’ve heard is pretty common. However, looking over the FODMAPS list, I cannot believe how many things are considered restricted. My doctor said that I shouldn’t cut out these foods altogether, but I’m just wondering if anybody else who has IBS could tell me what works for you. Which foods do you cut out entirely, and how much can you eat of trigger foods before feeling sick? Is it just trial and error?

Thanks so much!
Good morning, all! I have recently started taking Xyzal. I took it a number of years ago and it worked well for me, so when it went over the counter, I decided to try it. And I have felt off this entire week. I had only one other incident that I could have been “gluten” (flavored K-Cup that is just labeled with natural flavors), but since I am only intolerant, usually within 48 hours of being glutened I feel better. I am DRAGGING today.

I went crazy on a Google search trying to find out if Xyzal is gluten free. I have run into a lot of things. Some sources say yes it is. Most other sources say nothing. The big long gluten free med list (PDF) online, which was updated in April 2017 (a week ago actually) does not list Xyzal as gluten free, so I’m now distressed that I’ve been poisoning myself for over a week.

Does anyone out there take it and have issues at all? Has anyone ever contacted the company to find out if its gluten free? I am going to contact them later today. I tried to search the forums but was inconclusive as well. :/

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 05 May 2017 15:30:00 +0000

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